Grand chief hosts Indigenous Affairs minister

(Courtesy Mohawk Council of Kahnawake) December 10 wasn’t the first time Quebec’s minister responsible for Indigenous Affairs, Ian Lafrenière, came to Kahnawake, but it was his first tour of the community. He had a particularly qualified guide in Mohawk Council of Kahnawake grand chief Kahsennenhawe Sky-Deer. At least one of the stops might

Bringing Indigenous women leaders together

(Courtesy Assembly of First Nations) Mohawk Council of Kahnawake grand chief Kahsennenhawe Sky-Deer attended a historic meeting of Indigenous women leaders on Tuesday, held at governor-general Mary Simon’s home in Rideau Hall. Sky-Deer and Simon met with the Assembly of First Nations national chief RoseAnne Archibald and grand chief of the Grand

Remembering the children

On September 30, community members came together as they have done for the past six years to commemorate survivors of residential schools for Orange Shirt Day. This year, however, was different. With the discovery of thousands of unmarked graves at former residential school sites across the country and Canada finally recognizing

Indigenous leaders inspire Montreal crowd

Every word spoken by Katsi’tsakwas Ellen Gabriel carried through the heavy air as hundreds of people attentively listened, desperately trying to absorb their meaning. “Why did it take finding evidence of the children for you all to rise up together with us?” pleaded the Kanehsata’kehró:non, as she addressed the sea of

Pushing to recognize Indigenous languages

Perry Simon was holding up an eagle feather gifted by his great aunt when he asked the five major federal party leaders about whether they intend to make First Nations, Metis and Inuit languages part of the official languages of the country. “It’s a question that should’ve been asked, addressed and

Cancel Canada Day

COURTESY RUSTY NOLAN On July 1, as people around the country gather at barbecues and terrasses, adorning themselves with red and white and waving the Canadian Flag, many have asked what are they really representing? In light of recent events in which unmarked graves of young children are being uncovered all over

“They didn’t win, we are still here”

FILE PHOTO After Bill C-5 passed earlier this month, the federal government is now officially recognizing September 30 as the National day for Truth and Reconciliation (Orange Shirt Day). This sacred day was introduced by the strength and determination of Phyllis Jack-Webstad. The brave woman retold the story of her first day in

Indigenous languages acknowledged

COURTESY GOVERNMENT OF CANADA On Monday, June 14, the federal government appointed the first-ever commissioner to protect endangered Indigenous languages. Four representatives, the commissioner, Ronald E. Ignace, and three directors - Georginia Liberty, Joan Greyeyes and Robert Watt - make up the first-ever Office of the Commissioner of Indigenous Languages (OCIL). Commissioner Ignace,

Day school students get runaround

TEHOSTERIHENS DEER THE EASTERN DOOR As a national outcry persists following the recent uncovering of childrens’ graves at a residential school in Kamloops, BC, former students of federally-operated institutions are forced to come to terms with this tragedy while continuing their own battle for justice. Since January 13, 2020, Indigenous people forced