Speaking in honour of her family

Courtesy Tekahnekake Stacey “As a kid, I always wanted to be fluent in my family’s language,” said Tekahnekake Stacey, an upcoming graduate of the Kanien’kéha Ratiwennahní:rats Adult Immersion Program run by the Kanien’kehá:ka Onkwawén:- na Raotitióhkwa Language and Cultural Center. “I looked up to people in my family that were fluent,

Language grad looks ahead

Courtesy KOR “I don’t speak Mohawk.” Kahsennenhawi Kirby remembers her embarrassment whenever an elder would ask her a question in Kanien’kéha, and these words would fall from her mouth. Kirby’s grandmother, Rita Phillips, was a first-language speaker who worked hard to fortify Kanien’kéha in the community, even writing curricula for local

Losing identity and finding it again through language

Jessica Lazare is focused on continuing her dive into culture and language and plans on being a part of Kahnawake’s future. (courtesy Teiotsistohkwathe Jessica Lazare) [apss_share] Kanien’kéha Ratiwennahní:rats Adult Immersion Program graduate Teiotsistohkwathe Jessica Lazare has her eyes on her community’s future and is taking the steps to be a part of

No breaks for Sunday when it comes to language

Kanien’kéha Ratiwennahní:rats Adult Immersion Program graduate Chelsea Sunday isn’t giving herself any time to celebrate her finished studies in the Kanien’kéha language. Catch her in Akwesasne planning and integrating the language and culture wherever she can. (Kahenientha Cross, The eastern Door) [apss_share] Relaxing after a tough two years with the Kanien’kéha Ratiwennahní:rats

Language, culture and Skye’s pursuit in justice

Kanien’kéha Ratiwennahní:rats Adult Immersion graduate Shea Skye is on her way to solving crimes and speaking Kanien’kéha at the same time. She hopes to find a way to mix both her studies at Carlton and Ratiwennahní:rats. (Kahenientha Cross The Eastern Door) [apss_share] Kanien’kéha Ratiwennahní:rats Adult Immersion Program graduate Shea Skye survived “the

Fishing, trading and reviving the language

Kanien’kéha Ratiwennahní:rats Adult Immersion graduate Teiotién:taron River McComber’s goal is to revitalize the language, and have one of the many pairs of shoulders that will carry the language forward. (Kahenientha Cross, The Eastern Door) [apss_share] Kanien’kéha Ratiwennahní:rats Adult Immersion Program graduate Teiotién:taron River McComber sat with The Eastern Door before his Wednesday

Háo’ Tewatatíhsek Tsi Nitewawennò:ten’

The kids who signed up to paddle this summer at Onake also got a chance to develop their language skill, and the Ionkwawenní:io Kanien'kéha course will continue this fall. (Courtesy Onake Paddling Club) [apss_share] Tuesday afternoon at the Onake Paddling Club Kahentiio Rice and Cassidy Meloche inflated the “Big Mama Beluga” family paddleboard,

A family of four working to build first language

Britlee Karonhiákwas Diabo is excited about raising her two children where the first language is Kanien’kéha, spoken by both herself, her young children and her boyfriend. (Daniel J. Rowe, The Eastern Door) [apss_share] Pregnant and in her first year of the Kanien’kéha Ratiwennahní:rats Adult Immersion Program, Britlee Karonhiákwas Diabo and her boyfriend Shawn

Clarifying the big picture through Kanien’kéha

Taking two years to immerse herself in the language was something Kahentiio Rice built towards by working to build a foundation in the language throughout her life. It is something she is proud to have done. (Courtesy Kahentiio Rice) [apss_share] Working fulltime at the Kahnawake Youth Center, Kahentiio Rice took every opportunity